A Window in Thrums.

By J M Barrie

Printed: 1889

Publisher: Hodder & Stoughton. London

Dimensions 14 × 20 × 3 cm
Language

Language: English

Size (cminches): 14 x 20 x 3

£27.00
Buy Now

Item information

Description

Black cloth binding with gilt title on the spine.

  • F.B.A. provides an in-depth photographic presentation of this item to stimulate your feeling and touch. More traditional book descriptions are immediately available.

This is the second edition of 2,000 following the short run of 500 in the first edition.

Window in Thrums – the story of the “untrue son” – is about the fictional village of Thrums. The story and setting is widely acknowledged to be modelled on Barrie’s home town of Kirriemuir. It was one of his earlier works which along with Auld Licht Idylls, also published in 1889, contains many memorable sketches and illuminations of Scottish life at the time, and paved the way for Barrie’s great career.

Barrie submitted a piece to the St. James’s Gazette, a London newspaper, using his mother’s stories about the town where she grew up (renamed “Thrums”). The editor “liked that Scotch thing” so well that Barrie ended up writing a series of these stories. They served as the basis for his first novels: Auld Licht Idylls (1888), A Window in Thrums (1889), and The Little Minister (1891).

Sir James Matthew Barrie, 1st Baronet, OM (9 May 1860 – 19 June 1937) was a Scottish novelist and playwright, best remembered as the creator of Peter Pan. He was born and educated in Scotland and then moved to London, where he wrote several successful novels and plays. There he met the Llewelyn Davies boys, who inspired him to write about a baby boy who has magical adventures in Kensington Gardens (first included in Barrie’s 1902 adult novel The Little White Bird), then to write Peter Pan, or The Boy Who Wouldn’t Grow Up, a 1904 West End “fairy play” about an ageless boy and an ordinary girl named Wendy who have adventures in the fantasy setting of Neverland.

Although he continued to write successfully, Peter Pan overshadowed his other work, and is credited with popularising the name Wendy. Barrie unofficially adopted the Davies boys following the deaths of their parents. Barrie was made a baronet by George V on 14 June 1913, and a member of the Order of Merit in the 1922 New Year Honours. Before his death, he gave the rights to the Peter Pan works to Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children in London, which continues to benefit from them.

Want to know more about this item?

We are happy to answer any questions you may have about this item. In addition, it is also possible to request more photographs if there is something specific you want illustrated.
Ask a question
Image

Share this Page with a friend