Wood Magic.

By Richard Jefferies

Printed: 1881

Publisher: Cassell Petter Galpin. London

Dimensions 14 × 21 × 3 cm
Language

Language: English

Size (cminches): 14 x 21 x 3

£90.00
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Item information

Description

Green cloth binding with gilt title on the spine. Black tree branch on the front board.

F.B.A. provides an in-depth photographic presentation of this item to stimulate your feel and touch. More traditional book descriptions are immediately available.

FIRST EDITIONS REBOUND INTO ONE VOLUME

A lovely set, of which 500 copies were reputedly published. A novel for children, with a printed dedication to the author’s son Harold (i.e., Richard Harold Jefferies). This publication marks the first appearance of Jefferies’ character ‘Bevis’ who would appear again the following year in the eponymous three-decker. Miller & Matthews

John Richard Jefferies (6 November 1848 – 14 August 1887) was an English nature writer, noted for his depiction of English rural life in essays, books of natural history, and novels. His childhood on a small Wiltshire farm had a great influence on him and provides the background to all his major works of fiction.

Jefferies’s corpus of writings covers a range of genres and topics, including Bevis (1882), a classic children’s book, and After London (1885), a work of science fiction. For much of his adult life he suffered from tuberculosis, and his struggles with the illness and with poverty also play a role in his writing. Jefferies valued and cultivated an intensity of feeling in his experience of the world around him, a cultivation that he describes in detail in The Story of My Heart (1883). This work, an introspective depiction of his thoughts and feelings about the world, gained him the reputation of a nature mystic at the time, but it is his success in conveying his awareness of nature and people within it, both in his fiction and in essay collections such as The Amateur Poacher (1879) and Round About a Great Estate (1880), that has drawn most admirers. Walter Besant wrote of his reaction on first reading Jefferies: “Why, we must have been blind all our lives; here were the most wonderful things possible going on under our very noses, but we saw them not.”

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