Junius Letters. Volumes 1& II.

Printed: 1872

Publisher: Henry Sampson Woodhall. London

Dimensions 11 × 16 × 3 cm
Language

Language: English

Size (cminches): 11 x 16 x 3

£194.00

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Item information

Description

Full tan leather binding with black tile plate, raised and gilt banding, gilt lettering on the spine.

  F.B.A. provides an in-depth photographic presentation of this item to stimulate your feel and touch. More traditional book descriptions are immediately available.

Junius was the pseudonym of a writer who contributed a series of political letters critical of the government of King George III to the Public Advertiser, from 21 January 1769 to 21 January 1772 as well as several other London newspapers such as the London Evening Post.

Charges were brought against several people, of whom two were convicted and sentenced. Junius himself was aware of the advantages of concealment, as he wrote in a letter to John Wilkes dated 18 September 1771. Two generations after the appearance of the letters, speculation as to the authorship of Junius was rife. Sir Philip Francis is now generally, but not universally, believed to be the author.

According to Alan Frearson there is scholarly consensus in favour of Sir Philip Francis; he divides the evidence into four classes, and reports that each class “points most strongly to Francis”.

This scholarly theory has been called the “Franciscan theory”, at least since Abraham Hayward’s More about Junius: The Franciscan theory unsound (1868). Numerous subsequent publications have been written by those sceptical about the identification with Francis. John Cannon, editor of an edition of the Letters published in 1978, adhered to the Franciscan theory. As Francesco Cordasco puts it, “while the Franciscan theory has recently enjoyed new life, it remains contested and impossible to demonstrate categorically”

NOTE: The original collected edition of the letters, which were first published in the London PUBLIC ADVERTISER from Jan. 21, 1769 to Jan. 21, 1772 under the pseudonym of “Junius” (possibly Sir Philip Francis). “.’Junius’ poured brilliantly slanderous invective upon Tory-minded English ministers, especially the Duke of Grafton, for a series of ‘inconsistent measures’ which allegedly ruined England and drove the colonies ‘into excesses little short of rebellion.’ Vehement, lucid, frequently reprinted in English and colonial newspapers, the letters were polemical masterpieces with such extraordinary knowledge and appreciation of contemporary colonial opinion that they lent moral support to the early revolutionary cause. ‘Junius’ opposed the Tea Duty, but upheld the legality of the Stamp Act, and prophesied (Dec. 19, 1769) that the colonies aimed at independence” The original collected edition of the letters, which were first published in the London PUBLIC ADVERTISER from Jan. 21, 1769 to Jan. 21, 1772 under the pseudonym of “Junius” (possibly Sir Philip Francis). “.’Junius’ poured brilliantly slanderous invective upon Tory-minded English ministers, especially the Duke of Grafton, for a series of ‘inconsistent measures’ which allegedly ruined England and drove the colonies ‘into excesses little short of rebellion.’ Vehement, lucid, frequently reprinted in English and colonial newspapers, the letters were polemical masterpieces with such extraordinary knowledge and appreciation of contemporary colonial opinion that they lent moral support to the early revolutionary cause. ‘Junius’ opposed the Tea Duty, but upheld the legality of the Stamp Act, and prophesied (Dec. 19, 1769) that the colonies aimed at independence”

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